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1930's semi-detached house

1930's semi-detached house

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1930's semi-detached house

Between World War 1 and World War 2, a building boom took place in England. Any town or city from Bournemouth to Barrow-in-Furness experienced huge growth, as public transport improvements meant that the ordinary working class family could escape from the cramped town centre Victorian terraces to a home in the “country”. The bulk of the houses built between the wars were 3-bedroomed, semi-detached, with good solid roofs, and private gardens epitomising the maxim that “an English man’s home is his castle”. Ironically this move into the “countryside” created suburbia as it has become known, and the term “commuter” for the breadwinner who now had to travel some distance into the town or city to work. The 1930’s semi stands out as an example of solid English architecture, offering peace and security, in a time when the world was unsettled. Many people still live in their semis, and would never leave them. They are typical of English practicality, and economy, sharing a roof, but affording privacy, and the sense of loving the countryside and open space.

Rosemary Ralph

NOMINATION 44 OF 1160

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I live in Clevedon. I live in an area which consists of mostly 1930s semi-detached housing, in fact my grandad lives in one. The floorplan consists of a living room in the front of the house with a box bay window and fire place. Behind the dining room lies the kitchen. Double bedrooms and a single WC and separate bathroom follows. Most houses in the area (including grandads) have a garage, and additional 2 bedrooms which were usually added in the 1950s.
Declan


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My nomination is the garden shed.

FELICITY HAGUE

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