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Flying Scotsman

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Comment on Flying Scotsman

Whether you want to call it a "service" or a "locomotive", both were national icons. The 4472 Locomotive is one of the world's greatest trains. I travelled the line behind her many times in the UK. She is distinctive with her green livery. British rail changed her number to 60103. There were also other locos including a Mallard A4 which bore the nameplate of Flying Scotsman. For all you rivet counters, in my opinion the most famous of them all was the A3 4472 and still is. She was also the first steam loco to crack the ton. She is at this moment being rebuilt ready for re-certification and expected to be back on track in 2010/11 - thanks to the generosity of the British public.

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2008-08-12 by David L Smithdale from Perth Australia


Comment on Flying Scotsman

4472 is most certainly an english icon

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2007-08-20 by Dave Hodson from Redditch


Comment on Flying Scotsman

I still maintain that the "Flying Scotsman" is more a service than a specific locomotive...although I do acknowledge that one design of locomotive was more distinctive than any other. I used the service for many years (Kings Cross, five minutes past four on the dot, to Newcastle-upon-Tyne) from 1943 until the sixties. THEN: 1962 saw a steep change in the Flying Scotsman SERVICE with the introduction of English Electric diesel electric locomotives onto the East Coast Main Line. The Deltics transformed the Flying Scotsman?s timetable by chopping an hour off the journey. Passengers were impressed and British Railways? publicity department made sure the Deltic-hauled "Flying Scotsman" was given due attention by the nation?s media." The above shows that other locomotives have been used on the Flying Scotsman Service. The "Flying Scotsman" Service actually began in 1862, and a list of engines used to pull the Flying Scotsman train includes: Stirling 4-2-2 'Singles' (GNR 1870). Ivatt Class C2 (GNR 1897), the first British Atlantics. Gresley A1 and A3 Class Pacifics (LNER 1922), including the eponymous locomotive. Gresley A4 Class Pacifics (LNER 1935), the fastest steam locomotives ever. British Railways Class 55 'Deltic' (BR 1961), the most powerful diesels ever built in the UK. British Rail Intercity 125 (BR 1976). British Rail InterCity 225 (BR 1990, and GNER since 1996). So, it is the SERVICE which is the Icon. There were many locomotives which helped to make it so....

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2007-02-23 by Terence Elliott from Sunderland


Comment on Flying Scotsman

In railway circles the Flying Scotsman locomotive already is an icon. It is instantly symbolic of the pre-nationalisation railways.

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2006-11-17 by Gray Wilson from Chesterfield Derbyshire


Comment on Flying Scotsman

Scotsman in its day was a manifestation of superior British Engineering, cementing a British tradition of at least 100 years. Dr Tony Marchington well understood the potential of this Country to resurrect itself after two World Wars and once again seize the Engineering and Scientific Crown that it had proudly worn. Uniquely then Tony Marchington's plan was to capitalise upon Scotsman's kudos to draw the interest of the young engineer, scientist and entrepreneur and inspire them to create wealth both for themselves and this great Nation. As Lady McAlpine says sadly Tony's plans were not to come to fruition. It is very sad because Tony gave everything to the project, which was not simply a flight of idea but more a life goal. Indeed I can recall in the late 70's being amazed when Tony left a pub lunch in Henley because he heard a steam engine passing by, and later us both going to the McAlpine family home nearby where Sir William had his own railway. I wouldn't write off Marchington yet, nor perhaps more importantly the goal so dear to him.

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2006-07-28 by Gerard Churchhouse from Colerne, Wiltshire


Comment on Flying Scotsman

I can't believe the inaccuracies in both the original and the comments. Alan Pegler owned the engine for nine years and ran out of cash in America where, had Sir William not rescued her, she was to become a static exhibit alongside Queen Mary. Sir William owned and ran her for 23 years, for the last two of which Pete Waterman joined him because, like so many men, he had always wanted to own her... but Tony Marchington made them an offer they couldn't refuse. Sadly that didn't work out and when SIr William tried to secure her for the NRM with someone else prepared to run her as a business, it didn't work out.

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2006-07-19 by Lady McAlpine from Henley on Thames


Comment on Flying Scotsman

Mr. Terry Elliott is incorrect. The Flying Scotsman is a specific engine/locomotive and the most famous in the world. Designed by Sir Nigel Gresley, the A3 pacific steam locomotive was manufactured in 1923 in Doncaster, turned out in the colours of the new LNER company ? which she still proudly wears, and is the only surviving engine of the class. Bought by Alan Pegler from BR in 1963, Flying Scotsman was one of the first preserved locomotives to pull trains on the mainline. She then travelled to America where she pulled packed special trains, crossed to the West Coast and was displayed as an attraction in San Francisco. Sir William McAlpine bought the locomotive in 1973 and she returned to the UK where Pete Waterman held a joint stake in the engine. Flying Scotsman toured Australia during the country?s bicentennial celebrations in 1988 and 1989. During this visit she set a new world record for a non-stop run for steam by hauling a train for 422 miles from Parkes to Broken Hill in New South Wales. Tony Marchington, then CEO of Oxford Molecular, bought the locomotive in 1996 and Flying Scotsman plc was formed in late 2001 with previous company Flying Scotsman Railways Ltd as a wholly-owned subsidiary. Flying Scotsman was completely rebuilt between 1996 and 1999 and was returned to the mainline with an oversubscribed ?Inaugural Run? to York in July 1999. Information from: - http://www.gvagrimley.co.uk/x1768.xml

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2006-05-17 by Dave Hitchborne from Lincolnshire


Comment on Flying Scotsman

The Flying Scotsman was not a specific engine, but a GNER SERVICE.

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2006-04-28 by Mr. Terry Elliott from Sunderland


Comment on Flying Scotsman

The Flying Scotsman is more of an English icon than a Scottish one, as the engine was built in Doncaster in 1923 and the service which ran between London and Edinburgh did much more mileage in England.

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2006-03-09 by Taxus from Medway


Comment on Flying Scotsman

Hello? The Flying SCOTSMAN! So you think the flying Scotsman s English do you?

Comment on Flying Scotsman posted 2006-02-08 by Stephanie Knight from Portsmouth England


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