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John Cleese's silly walk

774 of 1170 nominations

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John Cleese's silly walk

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John Cleese's silly walk

John Cleese’s long, gangly legs were made for silly walking — and he didn’t disappoint. What became known as "the silly walk" made its television debut in the Ministry of Silly Walks sketch, in the opening episode of the second series of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, broadcast on BBC2 on 15 September 1970. The cast introduced the world to a variety of goofy gaits, but it was Cleese’s bowler-hatted, pinstripe-suited civil servant demonstrating, among other things, a type of crouching goose-step that stayed long in the collective memory. Although Cleese reportedly hated the sketch (possibly because fans were always asking him to repeat the uncomfortable walk), it was detectable in his performance in The Germans, the last episode of the first series of Fawlty Towers, where deranged hotelier Basil Fawlty tries not to mention the war — and repeatedly fails.

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Your comments

It represents Monty Python and British humor in general, noted for its silliness, its wittiness, and its irreverance. No one could mistake Cleese's walk for a Nazi march; not with the prominent bowler hat and umbrella.

Beverly Preston


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I believe rice, peas and jerk chicken is an Icon of England.

Ade Adeluwoye

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