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Public Footpaths


Comment on Public Footpaths

I have heard that in order to remain "public" a footpath must be used by a member of the Public at least once a year. Is this true, and if yes, how is it clocked and who measures that such usage has occurred?

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2007-09-10 by Doris Brown from Evanston, IL USA


Comment on Public Footpaths

Our public rights of way are testament to the ordinary people of England making peaceful protest, when the enclosure acts started to enclose land where the public had always been able to roam. There followed a series of mass protests, called Mass Trespasses bringing about changes to the law that enabled rights of way to be established by virtue of 20 years use or more, and the creation of the Ramblers Association, which had to be consulted before a right of way was removed or diverted. Many public footpaths are allowed to just fall into disrepute by Local Councils who don't see their importance in the English landscape. The worst example is the plouging of Headland paths by unscrupulous landowners, or putting barbed wire alongside the path, both of which is an offence and yet Councils can't be bothered to do anything about it. If these are true Icons of England then it's time more people defended them before they vanish for ever.

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2007-07-19 by Rosemary Ralph from Mexico


Comment on Public Footpaths

Truely an English icon; public footpaths can be found in every corner of the country. The network covers ground from woodland to hill land, coastlines and even through towns. It exemplifies the values the country holds important: freedom and equality. These pathways serve to enable the British love of walking.

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-12-27 by Claire Adams from Sussex


Comment on Public Footpaths

We have an unparallelled network of footpaths to enjoy our beautiful landscape.

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-12-14 by Ruth Sherwin from all over rural britain


Comment on Public Footpaths

To an American visitor, the English public footpath is a true marvel, a mark of civilization that's sadly missing from this side of the Atlantic. And when it is encountered while wearing that other English icon, a pair of wellingtons, it's bliss.

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-12-14 by John Fisher from Minneapolis, Minnesota USA


Comment on Public Footpaths

The public footpath finger sign is unique to England. Across city and countryside they have offered a safe journey between places, towns and villages. They have provided recreation, discovery and a healthy pastime for Britons and tourists alike, in the past, now and for the future. They are embedded in the law of the land for future generations.

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-11-17 by phil slater from sydney


Comment on Public Footpaths

They represent the British countryside. They are used by many British people as well as tourists like myself.

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-11-17 by Dorothy Jones from Pointe-Claire, Quebec,Canada


Comment on Public Footpaths

There is little point in having beautiful countryside if it cannot be accessed. Here, one can get INTO the country, and in towns one has an ALTERNATIVE to roads. A breath of fresh air compared to some countries!

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-11-17 by Graham Watson from London, UK


Comment on Public Footpaths

They enable one to walk from A to B without being dominated by the noise, smell and danger of vehicles.

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-11-17 by David Crundall from Wimbledon, London SW19


Comment on Public Footpaths

Both the suburban alleyways between the houses that children can use as a shortcut to school, and the muddy stretches alongside the cornfields in the spring.. One of the things that along with the countryside and the hiking boots is essential to outdoor life in England. Upon my move to the US, I was distraught to find that landowners rights trumped the right to roam, and the vast majority of the countryside is off-limits.

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-11-17 by Alison Straub from Florida, USA


Comment on Public Footpaths

Many nations claim beautiful scenery but England is the only one which allows you to enter into it, to enjoy the fields and woods and sight and smells and sounds of our "green and pleasant land". The network of public footpaths, alerted to travellers by a wooden fingerpost off a country lane, is something which I as an expat miss very much. Whether for half an hour or a whole day, the ability to amble in the country at will makes for a very English experience - especially if a pub is the end point!

Comment on Public Footpaths posted 2006-11-17 by Cliff Brown from Auckland, NZ