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The Garden Temple

726 of 1160 nominations

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The Garden Temple

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The Garden Temple

Want to add a touch of class to your country estate? Feel the need to impress upon visitors your interest in foreign travel and appreciation of classical architecture? Or do you simply need somewhere quiet and secluded for those illicit, romantic tête-à-têtes? A garden temple is just what you need. These beautiful architectural follies began to spring up in England during the 18th century, commissioned by wealthy gentlemen and ladies inspired by their visits to Europe on the Grand Tour. The great age of the English landscape garden was in full swing and these mock temples gave a focal point to the exquisitely crafted vistas, both when gazed upon and peeped out of. Many of these temples survive for you to enjoy today and they’re frequently used for weddings or as the setting for a climactic declaration in a romantic costume drama. You might like to try a stroll in the tranquil landscapes at Stourhead, Stowe, Rievaulx Terrace, Painshill Park, Mount Edgcumbe or Studley Royal Water Garden to name but a few.

Petworth House Copyright NTPL/Rupert Truman www.nationaltrust.org.uk 01798 342207

NOMINATION 726 OF 1160

Your comments

The English landscape garden is arguably the greatest and most original contribution England has made to world culture. And that's from the late great Sir Kenneth Clark. Only the English aristocracy would sweep away their complex parterrre and replace them with what we now know of and love as English parkland - the English landscape garden. And what is in this arcadian landscape? Cattle, possibly. Lots of 'naturalistic' planting, yes. And always, an eyecatching temple. Temples catch the eye and close the view. They are a goal to aim for on a stroll and a complex statement about the relation between the English and their classical forebears. Always classical, sometimes round, always columned. A shady shelter, or somewhere to get out of the rain. And these are influential too - every summerhouse in every suburban garden, owes a debt of gratitude to these grand dames of English garden design.

Christopher Bazley


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I nominate the red pillar box.

Donna Spencer

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