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A Cup of Tea

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Comment on A Cup of Tea

It is universally acknowledged that when an English person is thirsty they must be in want of a cup of tea!

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2008-04-22 by Rahima Choudhury from london


Comment on A Cup of Tea

The classic British cuppa. 'PG Tips, it's the taste' is forever fresh in my mind, even if the chimps are long gone.

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2007-08-17 by Hilary Bowen from Woburn Sands


Comment on A Cup of Tea

Concerning the comment that "MIF" (Milk in First) is the wrong way to drink tea. I've heard it said that Princess Diana was a "MIF" type. From what I have seen there are just as many "MIF" as there are "MIL" (Milk in Last)

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2007-07-03 by Deb from U.S.A.


Comment on A Cup of Tea

As I understand "A cup of tea" for the English is a typical reaction to any adversity, be it big or small.

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2007-03-06 by jette joergensen from sweden


Comment on A Cup of Tea

Afternoon tea in England has been a tradition for well over a hundred years and there are so many attractive designs of teapot. These providers of cups of liquid nectar, ranging from the brown utility pot to the delicate Wedgwood or English chintz, can represent historical designs such as Georgian, Victorian and Art Deco. They are objects of beauty but at the same time useful. A teapot can be homely and cosy or an objet d'art.

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2007-02-23 by Katharine Chasey from Hampstead London


Comment on A Cup of Tea

Tea shops are collectively a uniquely English institution and played a part in the emancipation of women as one of the few places they could meet and chat unchaperoned and stay respectable. They also attract visitors from across the globe as part of our tourist heritage. The culinary invention of Lord Sandwich, who gave his name to the bread snack, was incorporated into the menu of the tea shop, which provided an ideal outlet between lunch and dinner. Tea-breaks became accepted in the workplace and the whole concept is now part of our culture. The English and tea are synonymous, and India and China must be very happy about it.

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2007-02-23 by warren garret from Combe St Nicholas Somerset


Comment on A Cup of Tea

Come and have a cup of tea, really means how are you , sit and come and chat. I see teapots in commercials, Coronation Street, in every British homes, in every British family. If you are proper you have two teapots. The everyday one that probably has a chipped spout. And the GOOD teapot for good company. It is typically a British icon.

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2007-02-16 by Donna Martin from Canada


Comment on A Cup of Tea

Putting the kettle on is an iconic English act, both in its utilitarian function, the precursor to a cup of tea, and also as a vital social defense for bridging awkward moments when we English can't think what to do or say. Very few other countries even have kettles, let alone centre their social lives round them.

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2007-01-30 by Tim from newmarket


Comment on A Cup of Tea

everybody drinks it i'm twelve and i drink it!

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2006-11-09 by max kelleher from devon


Comment on A Cup of Tea

I think the Cup of Tea is the biggest icon for England. In every sitcom you show (produced in England and about England) you always can see that the people drink tea at a special time of the day. Not everyone drinks tea in England but it?s a symbol for them like the potatoes for germans and in this case it?s the same, because not every german eat potatoes maybe it gives german who hate it.

Comment on A Cup of Tea posted 2006-09-28 by Tomi from Germany - Neuss City


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