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Hedges

Features

Come with us while we get lost in some fiendish mazes, drop in at the Museum of Garden History, and peer over the suburban hedge to see what the neighbours are up to

Mazes

Hedge mazes flourished in Britain until the 18th century, when landscape gardener Lancelot "Capability" Brown replaced formal gardens with natural-looking features. Here we find out more and hear from the world's top maze designer about his work.

Mazes
The Suburban Hedge

The Suburban Hedge

The hedge’s principal function is to divide. It is a means of marking off and limiting territory. “Everything within this boundary belongs to me,” it announces, adding for good measure, “Keep out.” It may look a little friendlier and more natural than a ten-foot-high wall topped with barbed wire and watchtowers, but its purpose is much the same.

Museum of Garden History

Tucked away beside Lambeth Palace on the banks of the Thames in London, is the Museum of Garden History. ICONS paid it a visit to find out more about the history of hedges in English gardens, and talked to acting chief executive Anne Jennings.

Museum of Garden History
Knot Gardens

Knot Gardens

Accordingly to the Museum of Garden History, a knot garden is “a formal garden planted with miniature, permanent hedges laid out in geometric or elaborately scrolling patterns.”

Topiary

Topiary is the art of creating living sculptures by carefully training and pruning hedges and trees.

Topiary
Ten Things…

Ten Things…

Don't hedge your bets - just try and see how many of our weird and wonderful facts you already know!