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William Blake: the Poet

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Comment on Jerusalem

After being in New Zealand for 41 years one of the few things that stirs my thoughts of home. Brought up with it at school, always the last hymn at final assembly of the term. The hymn that sent us on our way into the world of the grownups.

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2007-09-27 by John Davison from New Zealand


Comment on Jerusalem

So strong are his words as so powerful is its music that I envy the English people to have such an "unofficial national anthem". (I am Portuguese... but... God save the Queen!)

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2007-08-23 by Paulo Machado de Jesus from Estoril, Portugal


Comment on Jerusalem

Someone once pointed out that the first verse takes the form of a question to which the answer is "No".

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2007-02-06 by David Wintle from Coventry


Comment on Jerusalem

In my heart, I hold this to be England's national anthem. I agree with a previous comment that said if Scotland and Wales can have their own anthems then so can England. We've spent too long hiding behind Britain, and we need to start being proud to be English. This song stirs up a feeling of pride in every Englishman (or woman) and so it is perfect.

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2006-11-27 by leigh bagnall from leeds


Comment on Jerusalem

'Jerusalem' (words by William Blake, music by Sir Hubert Parry) has been suggested by many as the ideal English National Anthem (in addition to 'God Save the Queen' which of course is for all of Britain). It talks of other English icons (the countryside, the industrial landscape, our Christian heritage etc); it has a haunting and magnificent tune, and it sums up English fortitude and resilience in neat juxtaposition with our Patron Saint, St George, rich metaphors of defying foes relating to both.

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2006-11-24 by John Rivers-Vaughan from sussex


Comment on Jerusalem

First impression of the poem tells me the focus is religion, not England.

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2006-11-17 by Jon Cording from London


Comment on Jerusalem

You should have an audio, preferably from the last night of the Proms! I'm sure the BBC would oblige. You could add to the text the fact that the title of a very fine English film, "Chariots of Fire", was derived from the poem

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2006-08-30 by Stephen Highcock from Pennington, New Jersey


You can't beat it!

"I will not cease from mental fight, nor shall my sword sleep in my hand until we have built Jerusalem in England's green and pleasant land......." Whether sung in church or by Mike Scott of the Waterboys in a live recording, these words inspire courage and determination in the face of adversity. They celebrate something spiritual and powerful in the English psyche.

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2006-08-24 by Dominic Webber from East Sussex


Comment on Jerusalem

i believe that it should be Englands anthem along with land of hope and glory as it brings me a sense of pride and love for my country that is felt but very rarely expressed. These words speak out to ussaying ' love england it is special' the idea that the land is sacred and we are walking in the footsteps of our ancesters... I love it

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2006-07-13 by Victoria Brown from Sawston, Cambridge, ENGLAND


Comment on Jerusalem

I agree with a previous contributor, This makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end. The greatest hymn in the English language, matched only by Charles Wesley's O precious Love, and a vision of what England could be. The Scots have Flower of Scotland, The Welsh have Land of my Fathers, This should be the official English national anthem. There is nothing racist or jingoistic in this.

Comment on Jerusalem posted 2006-05-08 by Rob from Newcastle Upon Tyne


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