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Oak Tree

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Comment on Oak Tree

As a boy I lived in Lazenby, part of the parish of Wilton in Cleveland. We always celebrated Oak Apple Day. Children would get up early before school and find an Oak sprig to wear prominantly, those who were not suitably 'dressed' were waylaid on the way to school and whipped across the bare legs with stinging nettles. No simple 'nipping' in our area. As with other village customs the practice ended at noon. The old Wilton castle was in the same Parish, and I believe had been the family seat of the Bulmers and had been partially destroyed by Cromwell. So perhaps the area was also loyal to Charles.

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2008-04-22 by Tom Scarff from Phuket, Thailand


Comment on Oak Tree

From but a tiny acorn a mighty oak was born. It saw the birth of our nation and has stood tall throughout the history of this land. A noble tree by birth it has seen the Romans come and go, kings and queens rise and fall, two world ward and countless battles that make our history what it is. It has been used to build the first of our ships and to burn in the furnaces of the industrial revolution. It's life spans the centuries and it has seen this country rise up and flourish. Children have played under its mighty boughs in the past and the present as will the children of the future. It stands as a guardian of this sceptred Isle. The mighty Oak.

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2007-07-17 by Jack from United Kingdom


Comment on Oak Tree

Of all the English trees the oak is the most representative of a major element of the English character. It is one of our longest living trees ? it takes more than 70 years before it produces acorns and after 100 years of growth it then grows at a slower pace. It has been used for building houses and ships and making charcoal. Indeed in Elizabethan times a law was passed to protect the tree - as it had been so widely used, most of the major oak forests had been felled. A remedial programme at that stage has given us the woods we have at present, while individual oaks were usually planted to mark boundaries

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2007-03-30 by Pippa Greenwood from r


Comment on Oak Tree

Oak trees a dying in the countryside, as indeed the countryside will die without sensitive and careful management to protect it from the ravages of climate change anddevelopment caused by consumerism.

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2006-12-09 by Philip Greswell from North London/Hertfordshire.


Comment on Oak Tree

It is the quintessential emblem of the british landscape and relates to history, us as an island, past and current and future uses of timber, wildlfe conservation and the rural idyll.

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2006-11-23 by Jan Phillips from Cornwall


Comment on Oak Tree

i have an oak tree!

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2006-11-21 by billy bobsworth from england


Comment on Oak Tree

i would like to add that, as a child, a large Oak Tree stood at the bottom of our garden in Walthamstow, London, overhanging our Anderson shelter. I felt that it protected us from the 'doodlebugs'. Oddly, one old owl lived in it throughout the blitz, whilst other birds fled. It is this tree, plus the way plants soon colonised the bomb sites, that inspired me to become and environmentalist.

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2006-11-15 by Pete Perry from Stevenage, Herts


Comment on Oak Tree

The oak tree typifies the 'zeitgeist' of England. Not only did a King shelter in one, it is an emblem of what an Englishman stands for. It is sturdy, rugged and reliable. Economically, it has supplied this country with the wherewithal for furniture, ships and the basic necessities of life. Added to which, it is quite simply a thing of immeasurable beauty. The oak tree has been a symbol of this island for centuries and deserves a place on the shortlist of Icons of the environment. No image of the English countryside would be complete without an oak tree.

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2006-11-15 by Geraldine Faulkner from Wiltshire


Comment on Oak Tree

It is indigenous, mighty, ancient, and imperative - for the broad spectrum of wildlife it supports and for its part in the battle against polution and climate change. It is at the heart of our mythologies and traditions, our language and symbology.

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2006-11-13 by J Janum from England


Comment on Oak Tree

It has great historicle significance to this nation its shape showes great strength & power.

Comment on Oak Tree posted 2006-11-12 by A.M. Veitch from Wiltshire


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My favourite Icon of England has to be the Cornish Pasty.

Ian Baldry

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