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Comment on Punch and Judy

I understand that Punch and Judy is a long standing British theatrical tradition and reflects the eponymous Edwardian seaside era. However, I fail to understand how in a modern society this is relevant. This is essentially a performance demonstrating that domestic violence is not only common place, but emphasises the message that this serious social issue is humourous and acceptable. Domestic violence is responsible for the majority of deaths of women between 16 and 44 in Europe. This statistic includes cancer, war and car accidents. This should not be an ethos that the British embrace or are proud of.

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2008-03-28 by Dee from UK


Comment on Punch and Judy

I am a magician and was hoping to do a Punch and Judy Show as I personally find them very humourous. However, I can't find the correct dimensions for a P&J theatre. I was wondering if anyone knows? To contact me: [email protected]

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2007-12-03 by Ron Ray from Edinburgh


Comment on Punch and Judy

Is this a way to laugh at domestic violence.?

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2007-11-29 by Myra from Australia


Comment on Punch and Judy

Children laugh at his punkish behaviour. A natural aspiration to rebel and teach them morals. What is so wrong? You need to take the historical downfalls (cultural changes with feminism and gender roles), with a pinch of salt and remember the nostalgia it brings to your ancestors.

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2007-11-02 by Sarah O'neill from Farnham, Surrey


Comment on Punch and Judy

what percentage of children in uk today do you think have actually observed a punch and judy show?

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2007-02-13 by wendy nellis from UK Dorset


Comment on Punch and Judy

i think it is interesting & weird,but cool at the same time.

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2006-11-19 by nicole from florida


Comment on Punch and Judy

I wish I had seen a punch show as a child. I'm 34 now and strangely attracted towards this character. I discovered Punch from the cigar of all things! I have yet to see a live show.

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2006-09-15 by tim from fullerton, ca


Comment on Punch and Judy

A memory from trips to the seaside as a child, and shared by so many, but is also an English cultural tradition stretching back centuries.

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2006-05-25 by Paul Miner from Lewisham, London


Comment on Punch and Judy

Mr Punch was first seen in Covent Garden in 1662 and recorded by Samual Pypes. Since that time he and his family and cronies have appeared millions of times to children and adults throughout England! Punch and Judy are an essential part of English life, at fetes, fairs, carnivals, schools and beaches. There is quite a thriving population of Punch Professors. He is the peoples hero and villian all in one. They should be included.

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2006-02-05 by Gary Nunn from Salisbury, Wiltshire


Comment on Punch and Judy

With its roots in the Commedia dell' Arte it is the one surviving example of popular English Theatre, and holds a place in the childhood memories of most people brought up in this country.

Comment on Punch and Judy posted 2006-02-05 by Ray DaSilva from Gillingham, Dorset


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