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St George's Flag

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Comment on St George's Flag

Saint George's Cross was (and still is) the City of Genoa's flag before 1200. English merchants needed the flag to sail across mediterranean sea, so they asked City of Genoa to use the flag.

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2008-07-14 by Claudio from Genova (Italy)


Comment on St George's Flag

Whilst growing up the only flag I identified with was the Union Jack. I would not have been able to tell you the name of the English flag, thanks to my Catholic school education! Whether we like it or not it was, and is, our national flag. It does not belong to Protestants it does not belong to Catholics and it does not belong to the BNP - it belongs to the people of England. Ashamed of it? Or ashamed of yourself? For all our faults and bloody histories I LOVE ENGLAND!

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2008-07-01 by Jim Armitage from China


Comment on St George's Flag

The St George Flag is England's National Flag...get over it! Don't forget April 23rd St Georges Day. A day to celebrate Englishness!

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2008-04-04 by David Ford Lane from Bedworth


Comment on St George's Flag

This will propbably come as a surprise to many, but the people from Celtic Nations see the flag of St George as the 'Blood Banner' or the 'Butcher's Apron'. An example as to why...BISHOP BILL APOLOGISES FOR CORNISH MASSACRE on 30 June 2007: "The massacre of thousands during the vicious suppression of a Cornish rebellion more than 450 years ago was an "enormous mistake" which the Church should be ashamed of." In acknowledging the "brutality and stupidity" of the atrocities on behalf of the Church, Bishop Bill Ind tried to heal much of the hurt felt by many Cornish people, who believe the Church of England has long tried to ignore the events of 1549 Prayerbook Rebellion. In a wide-ranging address at Pelynt Parish Church in South East Cornwall, the man dubbed "The People's Bishop" attempted to draw a line under a moment in history which left one in ten of the Cornish population dead. If this were to happen in today's world it could well be described as 'genocide'. So it's of no surprise then, that certain parts of 'English History' fails to be included in the National Curricculum - or should that be the English National Curricculum?

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2007-12-11 by Kernow bys vyken from Kernow


Comment on St George's Flag

Historically, the Cross of St. George was never the emblem of England, nor of the English people. The White Dragon and St. Edmund represented them. Following the catastrophe at Hastings in 1066, in order to destroy all links with their Anglo-Saxon past, the English were subsequently forced to accept a foreign language,flag and Patron Saint, who may not even have existed. This desire to keep the English in their place continues today, namely by the British State. As for Cornwall, perhaps these Cornish "nationalists" should brush up on their history. It may have been a King of England who finally subdued that part of the world, but he was neither English, nor led an English army.

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2007-11-26 by Michael Brown from Sunderland, England


Comment on St George's Flag

It means very little to me. I associate it with a hopeless football 'team' filled with mulit-millionaires who couldn't give a damm and soccer hooligans (the scum from the sewer of society). Anyway, I have always thought of myself as British rather than English.

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2007-10-05 by Barry Scarefe from Brentwood, Essex


Comment on St George's Flag

With the Welsh and Scots flying their parts of the Union flag I believe that we (the English part of the UK) should have the right to fly the English flag also. This may restore some pride back into being English...

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2007-09-28 by roger spencer from spain


Comment on St George's Flag

Curious that the last but one comment claims the Cross of St George as a Catholic flag, but the last comment derides it as a protestant one.

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2007-02-06 by David Wintle from Coventry


Comment on St George's Flag

There is a rhyme in Cornwall which commences: 'Ancient flag of blood red cross Cause of many a Cornish loss' This flag has a terrible reputation in Cornwall following the English massacres of the Cornish in 1497 and 1549, the latter when the Act of Uniformity was enforced on the Cornish by the English and when an estimated 10% of the Cornish population murdered. No wonder we Cornish refer to it as the 'butcher's apron' and 'blood banner'. A much sullied and disgusting emblem.

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2007-01-16 by John Baragwaneth from Cornwall/Kernow


Comment on St George's Flag

Ask yourself this question: what would St. George have thought? A man who was martyred for his faith? His Catholic faith. England once a great Catholic country, land of saints and the Dowry of Our Lady decided to adopt his Arms. Most people of this land have betrayed St. George: his memory, his faith, his devotion. How many of you still pray or honour St. George? How many ask for his intercession? The cross of St. George is not a Christian flag, but a Catholic flag. In addition to the secular peoples of this land, it is complete and utter hypocrisy of any protestant to honour this flag. "The fall of the best make the worst", as they say, and this now secular and utterly Godless country has certainly proved that.

Comment on St George's Flag posted 2006-11-29 by David from London


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