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The Pint

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Comment on The Pint

The "pint" derives from the French "pinte" ie from the old European weights and measures system prior to the International World Standard so in essence the "pint" ie 560 ml is Gallic and not really British at all.

Comment on The Pint posted 2008-04-10 by Philip from Manchester


Comment on The Pint

Do not forget the iconic significance of real ("scrumpy") cider! I love my real ale but since moving to Somerset I have also renewed my appreciation of a pint of cloudy cider that tastes just like apple juice...until I fall over. Also what could be better on a hot summer's day than to purchase a big container of cider from a farm, sit outside in the back garden and share it with your friends and family?

Comment on The Pint posted 2008-03-11 by Valerie Travers from Bath


Comment on The Pint

Drinking bitter beer in a pub - that?s England.

Comment on The Pint posted 2007-09-28 by hoelscher gottfried from Am Woerden 2a 48231 Warendorf Deutschland


Long live the pint

Metric is here to say and I will welcome it here in the USA however, nothing says every industry should take it on. I love to have a pint or a half of beer but here in the USA, were stuck with 12oz. English beer should always be a pint anyway, otherwise it would make the cool TV series "Two pints of lager and a packet of crisps" title a bit meaningless.

Comment on The Pint posted 2007-07-03 by David Hardingham from Tampa fl USA


Comment on The Pint

A pint of bitter in your local, the pinta on the doorstep in the morning, even a pint of prawns on a wet windy day by the sea. This measure of volume is so evocative of everything that is England.

Comment on The Pint posted 2007-03-30 by Richard Cadman from Norfolk, England


Comment on The Pint

When served in great condition, cask beer is the best drink in the world. It is a wholesome product brewed using 4 natural ingredients (malted barley, water, hops and yeast). No other country produces as much, or as high quality cask beer as England does and Greene King IPA is the best selling cask beer in the country. It won gold in the Champion Beer of Britain Awards 2004.

Comment on The Pint posted 2007-02-20 by Frances Brace from Bury St Edmunds


Comment on The Pint

What a beautiful photograph, seemingly quite empty on the surface yet packed with signifigance. I could drink a pint right now!

Comment on The Pint posted 2007-01-16 by Terry Doller from Sussex


Comment on The Pint

Movements like CAMRA help to keep alive the idea of 'the pint' despite metric interference from Europe. But it's championed elsewhere. The beer tent at summer events. The man at home brewing in the garden shed. The flurry of micro breweries and the wide choice in decent supermarkets. Even if the beauracrats insist decent beer has to be sold in millilitres you won't stop people drinking from a pint glass.

Comment on The Pint posted 2006-11-21 by Bill Smart from London


Comment on The Pint

A style of beer brewed during the colonial days in India. Perfect for a hot summers day. Often copied, but never surpassed

Comment on The Pint posted 2006-08-03 by Steve from Colchester


Comment on The Pint

England has a rather undeserved reputation for binge-drinking - but this has nothing to do with pints of Real Ale. Go to any beer festival (the GBBF in Earl's Court would do nicely) and, even though there are thousands of people sampling hundreds of beers, you will never see drunkenness or bad behaviour. Go into any pub selling chemical fizz lagers and you'll see all the violence and misbehaviour you could want. Long live the pint or Real Ale; it speaks for everything that is good about England and the English.

Comment on The Pint posted 2006-08-03 by Richard English from Partridge Green, West Sussex, England


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